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20121108
20121116
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WUSA (CBS) 20
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
uses technology is an age old question. >> reporter: the technology isn't available to the general public yet, but he expects it will be sometime next year. what do you think about this? should this kind of technology be availableo the public or even government agencies? tweet me at kenwusa9. i would love to hear your comments. >>> people named their sexiest man alive, and he's probably a favorite of a lot of yours. >>> plus we have a warning for toyota owners out there. details on a recall. one of their most popular models is involved. >>> do you think your power bill is high? one guy got one for 11 grand. when he complained, pepco said that was wrong. it was actually more. his frustrating battle is next. >>> topper. >> well, neither dulles or national made 50 today. we were in the 40s. more like december. and here is your wake up weather. grab your coat and sunglasses. 30s at 5:00. but 28-38 at 7:00. we'll come back and talk about the temps and look ahead to the weekend. still watching the coastal storm for the weeke >>> just moments ago, we learned prince george's county police
students might be developing the cuttin edge technology when it comes to the natural disaster relief. they show us how they are competing for the competition in math, science, technology. >> and that will be a big wild view. >> they have problem solving down to a science. the high schoolers are creekal winners of the foundation science award, a prestigious honor. >> it is like a fingerprint. >> reporter: they developed the computer software that recognizes where a picture was taken. >> the big dips is what matters. >> reporter: a process called geo location and it could be used in everything from the counterterrorism to the disaster relief. >> you don't need the whole rising. you could have bits and pieces. when i took this picture, i was not intended for that to happen. but i noticed little things just between them. and this bill too. and you know very accurately. >> you can do the participation. >> reporter: they were interns at the national institute of health when they developed a potential vaccine for the disease. it causes serious damage to the people's skin and many parts of t
the quantum leap in weapons technology between then and now. as the president pointed out in the debates, no other country comes close. >> we spend more on our military than the next ten countries combined. china, russia, france, the united kingdom, you name it next test-- . >> reporter: sequestration would not change that according to the center for strategic and budgetary assessment it is not the size of the cuts, about $50 billion a year that would be so damaging but the fact that they would be across-the-board. panetta adds that except for military pay every program from the joint strike fight tore military band was be cut by the same amount, 23%. >> it's absolutely a foolish thing to do. if you want to cut the defense budget that's fine. this is a foolish way to do it. >> reporter: in other words, if the pentagon were allowed to pick and choose its cuts sequestration might not be the disaster secretary panetta is predicting. david martin, cbs news, the pentagon. >> jeff: pentagon contractors aren't the only one in with a stake in this debate. 120,000 small contractors take part in t
brush head cleans in three directions with up to 50% more brush movements than leading sonic technology. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. [ male announcer ] why do more emergency workers everywhere trust duracell...?? [ male announcer ] when was the last time something made your jaw drop? campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> pelley: president obama will visit burma this month, the first for an american president. burma, in southeast asia, has been ruled by a military dictatorship for 50 years, but recently it's taken steps toward democracy and the president's trip is a reward for that. the pakistani school girl who stood up to the taliban is making a recovery in i had british hospital. these are new pictures of 15-year-old malala yousufzai reading some of the get well cards that have pored in. malala was shot in the head last month after speaking out for girls' education. her father said she will not be s
ignores the quantum leap in weapons technology. as the president pointed out in the debate no other country comes close. >> we spend more on our military than the next ten countries combined. >> reporter: sequestration would not change that. according to the center for budget assessment it's not the size of the cuts about $50 billion a year that's damaging but the fact that they would be across the board. panetta adds except for military pay every program from the joint strike fighters to military bands would be cut by the same amount, 23%. >> it's absolutely the worst thing to do. if you want to cut the defense budget that's fine, this is a foolish way to do it. >> reporter: if the pentagon were allowed to pick and choose its cuts sequestration may not be the disaster secretary panetta is predicting. david martin, cbs news, the pentagon. >> overseas for the first time since1973 the middle east war, israel has fired on syria. on sunday a mortar round from syria landed. there were no injuries. israel fired a warning shot in retaliation. israel officials acknowledge the mortar was not
technology that the government wants in every car in the country. >> but we begin this morning with a look at today's eye opener, your world in 90 seconds. >>> when they go after the u.n. ambassador apparently because they think she's an easy target, then they got a problem. >> president obama fires back at republican critics. >> the controversy over susan rice calling the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi spontaneous has reached a boiling point. after republicans threaten to block her possible nomination for secretary of state. >> the president thinks we are picking on people, he really does not have any idea of how serious this issue is. >> if senator mccain and senator graham and others want to go after somebody they should go after me. >> david petraeus will be on capitol hill tomorrow to testify about the september 11th attacks on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. >> we now know the identity of the fbi agent who triggered the investigation into the petraeus affair. >> three people have been killed ter rockets were fired into southern israel from gaza. the first isra
of technology. after the break, how to get rid of your expiring electronics, but do it the right way and why you should do that. we'll have it for you. >> in tonight's green alert, they tell us the average american household now owns 24 electronic products and many of them are old and collecting dust because consumers just don't know how to dispose of them. we have the answer and why it's worth the effort. >> reporter: as part of the geek squad is my old motto can fix just about anything that clicks. >> she said it freezes. >> reporter: but more and more, customers don't want to fix their electronics, they want to replace them. >> today, you might buy a tablet and you may use it and then who knows. six months down the line there may be another tablet that might have additional features. >> reporter: what happens to that old tablet is the problem. americans have 5 million tons of outdated electronics gathering dust which is why more states are requiring manufacturers and retailers to boost their recycling programs. americans recycle only 25% of their old electronics but it's easier than you might
in 2000 and electronic voting systems are a mature technology. there are excellent easy to use machines able with stringent quality control to ensure the integrity of the vote. i got to believe you're right about that but i have to ask how come we're not using such a system everywhere? finally a weather question from darren in california, maryland. i'm used to the measurement of the coldness of a night by dogs. in other words, a three dog night would be very cold. last night's weather topper measured the coldness in blankets. what's the conversion factor? how many blankets to a dog? i have no idea. so i brought in our own topper shutt to perhaps answer that pressing question. >> well, you gave me heads up. i've been debating. i'm going to say it's a 1 1-1 ratio. >> i always suspected having heat in the house and it negates the blanket effect. >> let's turn the heat down and save energy and sometimes it's nice to have a furyk tray blankets. you sleep -- a few extra blankets. you sleep better that way. >> i don't want to save energy that bad. >> i like your candor, sir. a great weekend a
. the report says that new technologies like fracking are research new reserves of oil in the u.s. the report says the u.s. could stop importing oil by 2035. in the middle east, syria's civil war has now touched israel. for the second straight day, a shell from syria landed in israeli territory. today an israeli tank destroyed a syrian armored vehicle. israel is just the latest neighbor pulled into the conflict. turkey has returned fire repeatedly sincereian shells first landed there in october. turkey, lebanon, jordan, and iraq now house more than 400,000 syrian refugees. it was 19 monthsing that a protest movement rose up to overthrow the dictatorship in syria, but there is no end in sight. lance armstrong has resigned from the board of his cancer charity. two weeks after sandy, why are so many people still in the dark? and we'll show you the jewels recovered from the "titanic" when the "cbs evening news" continues. you spend weeks planning it.] you spend all day cooking it. so why spend even a moment considering any broth but swanson? the broth cooks trust most to make the meal folks spend
more evidence they worked. >>> 3-d technology is making it easier for doctors to detect breast cancer. a new study in the journal of radiology finds it's more effective. it's accurate 91% of the time compared 207% for the standard two dimensional test -- paired to 87% for the standard two dimensional tests. >>> okay, moms and dads. listen up. this next story is for adults only. if your children happen to be awake, send them to the next room for about 30 seconds. we'll give you five. one, two, three, four, five. trojan says it's time to start talking about something that's becoming more mainstream. the company is giving away what it calls intimate massagers. over the summer thousands of people showed up in new york to get a free device. trojan says with books like 50 shades of gray, more and more people are talking about what happens in the bedroom. it's become becoming more and more main dream -- it's becoming more mainstream that people can express themselves openly. so trojan is giving away the intimate massagers at the park at 14th. that's 920 14th street northwest between k street
leg spasms and trip up. >> reporter: then daniel got the chance to try cutting edge technology. this brace wraps around the leg and chects to a sensor -- connects to a sensor in the foot. when the sensor picks up trouble walking, the brace sends an electrical pulse to the leg muscles to help patients lift the foot completely when walking, stimulating a more complete step. >> i have been able to leave behind the chair. >> this device is appropriate for patients who have an injury to their central nervous system. some of those impairments would be spinal cord injury, stroke, brain injury, multiple sclerosis. >> reporter: dobson is another example. she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2002. four years later, she could barely walk. >> yeah, i walked very slow. just took a lot of effort. i would drag my feet like foot drop. >> reporter: she started getting help from the l-300 last april and take a loot look at the difference. here she is walking with the l- 300 activated and here she is with the device off where she can barely stay balanced. no wonder she uses it all the tim
constantly have leg spasms. >> then he got to try technology. the brace wraps around the leg and connects to a censor. the brace sends an electric pulse to help patients lift the foot when walking stimulating a more complete step. >> i have been able to leave behind a chair. >> this device is appropriate for patients who have an injury to their central nervous system. some of those impairments would be spinal cord injury, stroke, brain injury, multiple sclerosis. >> she was diagnosed with ms in 2002. four years later she could barely walked. >> i walked slow. i would drag my feet like foot drop. >> she started getting help from the l 300 last april and take a look at the difference. here's her walking with the l 300 activated. and here she is with the device off where she can barely stay balanced. no wonder she uses it all the time. >> she's able to climb stairs again for the first time in years. >> we're very happy both from reeducation and exercise stand point. >> i haven't fallen since april which was pretty amazing. it was common i would trip on anything. >> the l 300 is used at sever
. >> reporter: until years later technology made day to night possible. >> you know, you can just see the way the light moves. it's pretty exciting. i love when the lights come up, you know. >> reporter: remember central park in the fall? back at his studio in connecticut, the first thing steven wilkes has to do is decide literally where to draw the line. where day ends and night will begin. in the final print. >> you can actually see it as time changes. >> reporter: the next step is to look at everyone of the images he shot, collect his favorites and then digitally fit them together like puzzle pieces. you could go blind looking at 1400 of those. >> you're looking for some small, tiny nuanced detail. >> reporter: like the brides. the brides started to evolve. i mean basically i saw one in the morning. midday. i mean they literally were showing up all day long. >> reporter: here they all are in the finished photograph. >> it was really kind of a moment like a where's waldo. as i ket shooting i kept noticing another bride here. >> reporter: what took that one october day to shoot took four mon
may be back sooner than that. >> don't you love technology? when it works it's good. when it doesn't, you've got us. >> that's right. over and over again. >> we love the weather. as mike said so much. we are doing it again. here's howard bernstein with more on the forecast. we're having technical glitches. >> but you were talking about it earlier. got lucky. it's early in the season this nor'easter we've had snow early. the veterans' day snowstorm 20 years ago you remember. >> yes. someone ran into my car. yes. >> well, so. >> yeah. >> all right. >> okay. we've got video and as mike said earlier, thousands of flights were canceled in advance of the storm. kristin fisher is at national airport with more on what you can expect this morning. kristin, it's good to see and hear you. >> reporter: hello. good morning everyone. well, you know, the impacts from this nor'easter can really be felt here at reagan. simply when you look at the departures board and the sheer number of flights that have been canceled across the northeast. overnight almost every flight to and from new york and new
, the challenge is retraining people already on the job to keep up with advances in technology. alcoa is one of the largest and oldest companies in america. it's been hiring skilled workers since 1888, and today has factories around the globe. at its aerospace plant in whitehall, michigan, 2,100 employees are working three shifts a day, seven days a week. german-born c.e.o. klaus kleinfeld says alcoa's competitive edge is innovation, backed up by a skilled workforce. they're producing parts that make jet engines 50% more fuel efficient. >> klaus kleinfeld: i would love to show you how the air flow goes inside. but that's part of probably the best-kept secret that this industry has. that's the innovation i'm talking about. >> pitts: and a person just can't walk off the street and put that together for you. >> kleinfeld: impossible. >> pitts: kari belanger came to alcoa with an engineering degree. the company trained her to program robots to do the work that, 50 years ago, was done by hand. alcoa also helped pay for rod coley to go back to school and get his engineering degree. he x-rays parts
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technology? >> and i think they are. i think what's interesting is the more engagement you see in the palm of your hand, you realize that's an opportunity we're all going after. >> i know mark zuckerberg tried to hire you in 2006. are you sorry you turned him down? >> it was one of the mistakes i made. i feel very lucky to have been part of many companies and i got to see interesting companies grow, everything from twitter to facebook to google, and for me, it's really about knowing the smartest people in the world, because i feel like i get to learn more from them. >> and now you get the chance to meet charlie and gayle. >> exactly. >> nick faldo won the masters and the british open three times each. he'll talk this morning of building a perfect golf swing and why tiger woods hasn't won a major title in four years. that's next right here on "cbs this morning." >>> who loves golf? we do. cbs sports golf analyst nick faldo won six grand slam titles in his career. his how-to book for golfers, "a swing for life" has just been updated and rereleased. >> it marks the 25th anniversary of his fir
with colorblend technology gives expert highlights and lowlights. for color that's true to you. i don't know how she does it. with nice'n easy, all they see is you. and we got onesies. sometimes miracles get messy. so we use tide free. no perfumes or dyes for her delicate skin. brad. not it. not it. just kidding. that's our tide. what's yours? it's time to free ourselves from the smell and harshness of bleach. and free ourselves from worrying about the ones we love. new lysol power & free has more cleaning power than bleach. how? the secret is the hydrogen peroxide formula. it attacks tough stains and kills 99.9% of germs. new lysol power & free. powerful cleaning that's family friendly. another step forward in our mission for health. that was me... the day i learned i had to start insulin for my type 2 diabetes. me... thinking my only option was the vial and syringe dad used. and me... discovering once-daily levemir® flexpen. flexpen® is prefilled. doesn't need refrigeration for up to 42 days. no drawing from a vial. dial the exact dose. inject by pushing a button. flexpen® is insulin delive
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)